Alberta’s much dreaded ‘new’ curriculum looks like an amateurish educational disaster

When Alberta Education Minister David Eggen announced two years ago that his government was about to launch the most sweeping changes ever undertaken in the public school curriculum, it gave rise to an altogether understandable fear, People saw the villainously conniving propagandists of the Left stealthily out to pervert and destroy the pristine purity of Alberta traditionalism. Well, we were wrong. The first version of the new social studies program came out last month, and it reads like something produced by a collection of school children.

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A statue sets off the latest evolution in the argument over evolution

Colby Cosh, the dependably interesting columnist in the National Post, scored again last week. He had noticed that Dayton, Tennessee, venue of the famous Monkey Trial in 1925, had erected a statue of Clarence Darrow, defender of the science teacher John T. Scopes, charged with teaching high school students that men were descended from apes. The prosecuting attorney was William Jennings Bryan, three-time Democratic candidate for the presidency, and a militant Presbyterian defender of biblical accuracy. (The Scopes trial became a nation-wide circus. It is covered at length in our Christian history series, Vol. 12, p. 66)

Continue reading A statue sets off the latest evolution in the argument over evolution

Ottawa’s oncoming sucker play to gain control of the web

It’s sad but hardly surprising that what is arguably the world’s most significant cultural development in the opening years of the third Christian millennium has largely escaped the attention of the world’s news media. I refer to the notable revival of Christianity in eastern Europe, especially in Russia, and the notable rejection of Christianity in much of the formerly Christian West.

Continue reading Ottawa’s oncoming sucker play to gain control of the web

The strange religious turnaround the media aren’t covering

It’s sad but hardly surprising that what is arguably the world’s most significant cultural development in the opening years of the third Christian millennium has largely escaped the attention of the world’s news media. I refer to the notable revival of Christianity in eastern Europe, especially in Russia, and the notable rejection of Christianity in much of the formerly Christian West.

Continue reading The strange religious turnaround the media aren’t covering

How the claptrap of Political Correctness is ruining political debate

Sticks and stones may break my bones,
but names will never hurt me.

I was delightfully surprised to discover last week that this aphorism, known to all children in my 1930s childhood, is still well known to children today. I stated the first line to two of my grandchildren who are in junior high school. and both provided the second line without hesitation. Which probably means that the entire Sixties generation absorbed it and passed it on to the post-modernists. and that the whole computer-television generation has failed to abolish it.

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Who needs God, now that we’ve got the Charter of Rights and Freedoms?

An intriguing headline in very large type was spread across the top of a page in the National Post earlier this month. It read: “When religion must yield to the law.” In the story beneath it, which covered most of a page, Toronto lawyer Derek Smith who (says the Post) “has been cited to the Supreme Court of Canada as a legal authority,” defends the stipulation that doctors who refuse to assist in suicides be required by law to direct applicants to other doctors who would. A group of Christian doctors are objecting. They argue that providing such information amounts to an endorsement of the procedure.

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Speaking as an Edmontonian. Jason, don’t listen to us Edmontonians

Though most luminaries of the left would shrink from actually admitting this, an implicit assumption nevertheless underlies the way they view humanity. The people are the property, so to speak, of the government. It owns all the elderly, all the citizenry the fit and the unfit, and in particular it owns and is wholly responsible for the children. True, the parents are allowed certain jurisdiction over their offspring, provided they educate them in all the values the government holds dear, and learn to think and believe the government-authorized version of reality.

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