How the claptrap of Political Correctness is ruining political debate

Sticks and stones may break my bones,
but names will never hurt me.

I was delightfully surprised to discover last week that this aphorism, known to all children in my 1930s childhood, is still well known to children today. I stated the first line to two of my grandchildren who are in junior high school. and both provided the second line without hesitation. Which probably means that the entire Sixties generation absorbed it and passed it on to the post-modernists. and that the whole computer-television generation has failed to abolish it.

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Who needs God, now that we’ve got the Charter of Rights and Freedoms?

An intriguing headline in very large type was spread across the top of a page in the National Post earlier this month. It read: “When religion must yield to the law.” In the story beneath it, which covered most of a page, Toronto lawyer Derek Smith who (says the Post) “has been cited to the Supreme Court of Canada as a legal authority,” defends the stipulation that doctors who refuse to assist in suicides be required by law to direct applicants to other doctors who would. A group of Christian doctors are objecting. They argue that providing such information amounts to an endorsement of the procedure.

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Speaking as an Edmontonian. Jason, don’t listen to us Edmontonians

Though most luminaries of the left would shrink from actually admitting this, an implicit assumption nevertheless underlies the way they view humanity. The people are the property, so to speak, of the government. It owns all the elderly, all the citizenry the fit and the unfit, and in particular it owns and is wholly responsible for the children. True, the parents are allowed certain jurisdiction over their offspring, provided they educate them in all the values the government holds dear, and learn to think and believe the government-authorized version of reality.

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A challenging after-dinner question that had to be left unanswered

I addressed the Edmonton branch of the Royal Commonwealth Society last week an organization I had never previously heard of. It is dedicated to principles preserved for the last 150 years by what in my youth was still known as the British Empire. It later became the British Commonwealth of Nations, and is now known simply as the Commonwealth of Nations. The Edmonton branch were a curious group of about 100 people, gracious, courteous and perceptive, two thirds oldsters and one third people in their 20s, to 40s. But what intrigued me most was an unusual question posed for me by one of the latter group.

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An awkward fact the teachers’ union ex-president never quite grasped

As H. Mark Ramsankar retired last month after four years as president of the Alberta Teachers Association, I recalled a highly illuminating public comment he made back in 2013 in defence of Alberta’s school system. David Staples of the Edmonton Journal, who then and still offers the most competent media commentary on that system, had suggested that what it most needed was not smaller classes, but better teachers.

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